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About this collection

 

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This digital collection brings together approximately 800 images produced by Baton Rouge photographer Andrew D. Lytle that are found in numerous separate collections held in Hill Memorial Library.

 

A native of Cincinnati, Lytle arrived in Baton Rouge around 1857.  Over the next fifty years or so, he and his business partners, including his son Howard, photographed Baton Rouge people, places, and community events such as parades.  Arriving on the scene just a few years before the Civil War, Lytle was well-placed to photograph Baton Rouge during the war, including scenes of naval vessels on the river, Federal encampments, damage and  streetscapes, and soldiers and sailors.  The faculty, cadets, student activities, and buildings of Louisiana State University Agricultural and Mechanical College, then at its former location where the State Capitol Building now sits, were also frequent subjects, as were the Louisiana State Penitentiary in Baton Rouge and inmates working at Angola and Hope farms and in Atchafalaya Basin levee camps.  He also photographed outdoor and nature scenes from the Baton Rouge environs, logging operations and rivers and watercraft, especially the Mississippi River and steamboats.  Lytle's surviving work, which is preserved in Special Collections, constitutes the most complete visual record of mid-19th and early 20th-century Baton Rouge.

 

Almost all of the digital images in “'Andrew D. Lytle's Baton Rouge' Photograph Collection”  were created from duplicate photographic prints that Howard Lytle made in 1903 from his and his father’s  existing work and compiled in albums.  A small number of digital images were created from a group of glass negatives that surfaced in the 1960s in Baton Rouge.

 

See also the "An Eye of Silver: The Life and Times of Andrew D. Lytle" online exhibition.

 
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